Posts Tagged ‘automobile designers’

Introduction

DYPDC Center for Automotive Research and Studies commenced session on 30 August, 2010. The weeks leading up to it were hectic, but at the same time exciting. The staff took great pains in planning and execution of the events.

Induction Week

The college started with the induction week, which was held from 30 August to 5 September 2010. The Induction week was filled with activities. It gave students a feel of how the college will function, what’s expected of them, their responsibilities etc.

  • Mr. Dilip Chhabria interacted with the students and answered all their queries, doubts and so forth
  • Students and faculty members had their formal introductions
  • Mr. Hrridaysh Deshpande gave a presentation on ‘What is design.’
  • Ms. Ratna Chatterjee, Senior Faculty, gave a presentation on ‘What is Automotive Design’
  • Faculty took the students through the undergraduate and postgraduate curriculum
  • Mr. Jagpreet Singh took a session on Mind Mapping for both undergraduate and postgraduate students.
  • Students participated in a group discussion on a topic related to design
  • Mr. Anthony Thomas, a senior English professor, conducted a workshop on Communication skill:  The students were introduced to “Elements of Effective Communication”, with the help of inputs from the trainer and practical interactive exercises. The students participated actively in the Workshop.
  • Mr. Mahendra Patel took a workshop on visual order. He covered topics like Harmony, Rhythm, Balance and Contrast :  Mr. Prof. Patel is one of the finest teachers of Design today. He has been a faculty with National institute of   Design, Ahmedabad for the past 39 years. He also conducts workshops and training programs at Faculty of Fine Arts, Baroda; Srishti College of Arts and Design, Bangalore, Mudra Institute of Communications, Ahmedabad, Industrial Design Center, IIT Mumbai, and Indian Institute of Crafts, Jaipur. He has also taught at Rhode Island School of Design, USA, Nova Scotia College of Arts, Canada, Christchurch College of Arts, New Zealand and Indus Valley School of Arts and Architecture, Pakistan. Presently, he is serving as adjunct faculty member at the Symbiosis Institute of Design (SID) and MIT Institute of Design, both of which are in Pune. He recently won the Gutenberg International Award for his contribution in font designing for Indian scripts, and map design and signage design for Indian cities.

Chevrolet Design Contest:

General Motors conducted a session with our students. They wanted our students to take part in a design contest titled, Design the Next Chevrolet. Mr. Anil Saini, Director, Design Studio (India) – General Motors, Bangalore came to our school, interacted with our students, gave them a brief history of General Motors – its past, present and future, and took questions from students.

Guest Faculty

Post the induction week, it was time to turn to serious academics. DYPDC Center for Automotive Research and Studies has an exemplary list of both Full-time and Visiting Faculty. So far we’ve have had two of the most respected designers as guest faculty at DYPDC Center for Automotive Research and Studies.

Mr. Patrick Roupin:

Mr. Patrick Roupin is an award winning Belgium designer. He holds a Masters degree in product engineering design from the ISD – Supinfocom Group, Valenciennes / Pune. He won the Designer for Real World – Victor PAPANECK Prize in 2004. Patrick formerly worked as a usability specialist for one of the world’s leading usability companies in India. He has also worked as a product designer with companies such as Decathlon and Faurecia in France.

His Workshop:

  • Students were exposed to the importance of user research.
  • The interacted with customers to gather information, which they used to re-designing and create innovations from scratch.
  • They went through the complete user research process, whereby they could understand each and every step of design analysis to conceptualization through practical exercises.
  • Their design directions were presented with user observation, videos and interviews they captured in the city.

Mr. Nicola Crea:

Mr. Nicola Crea is a design manager and consultant for product development, who has worked with great automobile companies like Pininfarina Concept Institute, Fiat, Mercedes-Benz cars and Giannini. In 1992, he ventured into designing of boats and motorcycles and started his own consultancy, “Victory design”, which is an engineering studio devoted to yacht design. From 2006 to 2008, he headed CISME (Centro Interdipartimentale di Studi sulla Mobilità Ecosostenibile), research center of studies on sustainable mobility. He is also the coordinator for all design activities for Tulton, a company that specializes in development of new products. He is a professor at the University of Chieti, and regularly collaborates with the Politecnico di Milano and University of Genoa.

His Workshop:

  • He primarily spoke of the design process, i.e. how it all begins to how the vehicle (the finished product) finally comes on to the road.
  • He spoke about how a car functions, how it is manufactured,
  • He spoke about sustainable design, sustainable future and the scope of design in India.
  • He also spoke about how a design project is to be handled by automobile designers.

All these activities, workshops, seminars, events and so forth have only reiterated the fact that DYPDC Center for Automotive Research and Studies is one of the foremost automobile design schools in Asia. We endeavor to have more such things in the near future, and make learning more vibrant and interesting for our students.

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Recently, there have been claims that some of the entries for the PMV contest are copies of existing designs. The faculty or Jury of DYPDC can’t be blamed for this, purely because there are a million concepts for new cars being produced almost every day, and it becomes extremely hard to keep a track. They tried their best to pick original designs and have done a great job.

Sumedh Bansode’s design is still the winning entry and is NOT AT ALL a Copy. It’s a ‘wheel’ concept and it ought to be round. You can’t have a square wheel. (Now this design that was claimed to be a copy of — ((http://technabob.com/blog/2010/02/15/yuji-fujimura-wheel-driver-vehicle/)) AND this one by some other designer ((http://psipunk.com/eos-triton-vehicle-uses-gyroscope-technology-to-balance-it-on-one-wheel-by-priyanka-martin/)) ARE THESE COPIES OF EACH OTHER??

So think before you blindly blame each other of plagiarism. Look at Sumedh’s design in its entirety.

The second claim: Cleft is a copy of Pixy….AGAIN…Not True. Now this design ((http://www.carshowp.com/search/motor+transport/))…is this a copy of Pixy too? or is it the other way round? What about this one by Honda? ((http://www.carbuyersnotebook.com/honda-3r-c-concept-coming-to-geneva/)) Is this a copy as well?

Cleft is, maybe, loosely inspired, is all. Otherwise it’s an original design by Vruttant Pathak. His entry stays in the competition too.

The other claim was regarding the wearable motorcycle (saying its a copy of
Yamaha Deus Ex) — idea wise maybe, but the thought that has gone into it, the design, is original.

At the end of the day you can always similar elements in vehicles. And that’s how it will continue to be. That DOESN’T MAKE THEM A COPY of each other.

So stop going around making all these false allegations. Except Avik Ghosh’s plagiarized entry, all the other designs remain in our honorable mentions list.

These are good times at DYPDC Center for Automotive Research and Studies. A lot is happening and it is happening quickly. It’s only been a fortnight since the undergraduate and postgraduate program in automobile design began and we’ve already had some of the best in the field of design interacting with our students.

First up was Prof. Mahendra Patel, who spent two days with our students teaching Visual Order. He covered topics like Harmony, Rhythm, Balance and Contrast. The time he spent with the students helped them immensely in understanding visual order and its extremely important role in design. A little about him : Prof. Patel is one of the finest teachers of Design today. He has been a faculty with National institute of Design, Ahmedabad for the past 39 years. He also conducts workshops and training programs at Faculty of Fine Arts, Baroda; Srishti College of Arts and Design, Bangalore, Mudra Institute of Communications, Ahmedabad, Industrial Design Center, IIT Mumbai, and Indian Institute of Crafts, Jaipur. He has also taught at Rhode Island School of Design, USA, Nova Scotia College of Arts, Canada, Christchurch College of Arts, New Zealand and Indus Valley School of Arts and Architecture, Pakistan. Presently, he is serving as adjunct faculty member at the Symbiosis Institute of Design (SID) and MIT Institute of Design, both of which are in Pune. He recently won the Gutenberg International Award for his contribution in font designing for Indian scripts, and map design and signage design for Indian cities.

We also have on our campus Mr. Patrick Roupin and Mr. Nicola Crea.

Mr. Patrick Roupin is an award winning Belgium designer. He holds a Masters degree in product engineering design from the ISD – Supinfocom Group, Valenciennes / Pune. He won the Designer for Real World – Victor PAPANECK Prize in 2004. Patrick formerly worked as a usability specialist for one of the world’s leading usability companies in India. He has also worked as a product designer with companies such as Decathlon and Faurecia in France. He’s doing some very interesting workshops with our students, which are mainly focused on social experiments.

Mr. Nicola Crea is a design manager and consultant for product development, who has worked with great automobile companies like Pininfarina Concept Institute, Fiat, Mercedes-Benz cars and Giannini. In 1992, he ventured into designing of boats and motorcycles and started his own consultancy, “Victory design”, which is an engineering studio devoted to yacht design. From 2006 to 2008, he headed CISME (Centro Interdipartimentale di Studi sulla Mobilità Ecosostenibile), research center of studies on sustainable mobility. He is also the coordinator for all design activities for Tulton, a company that specializes in development of new products. He is a professor at the University of Chieti, and regularly collaborates with the Politecnico di Milano and University of Genoa.

To be among such luminaries has truly been exhilarating for our students, who have eagerly absorbed all that these greats had to offer. Rest assured, it is only going to get bigger, better, and brighter from this point on.

In January this year, I went to the auto expo in Delhi, as part of DYPDC College and shared the space with DC Designs, watching in awe, each time Dilip Chhabria walked past me. And oh, what a memorable event. It was my first time and now I rue the fact why I never went before.

It wasn’t hard to figure that a lot of general crowd had got in on Business passes on the first two days (which was restricted only to business visitors), and how do I know that? Because a friend of mine told me, ‘Everyone knows someone in Delhi’.


Auto expos are a great place to see heaps of to-be launched vehicles. The energy is phenomenal. It’s like you’ve stepped in the midst of a metal concert and are surrounded by thousands and thousands of head-banging fans. The automobiles are displayed in their gleaming avatar, all polished and new, flanked on both sides by beautiful girls in short dresses, smiling and waving on the turntable. Auto expos mean to auto enthusiasts what Oktoberfest means to beer lovers. Of course most people do come to check out the girls as well.
Auto expos are the Disneyland of automobiles. Every where you turn you see a gorgeous looking vehicle enticing you towards it, hypnotizing you. A day is never enough to take it all in. It always feels like there’s too much to see and too little time see it all. You just might spend too much time ogling, say Mercedes cars more than needed, and in the bargain, not have enough time to check out the hot new Harley models or the awesome Enfield bikes. So you have to pace yourself, and most important of all, keep the excitement in check. Look, click, walk, should be your song if you want to cover the entire area. You thirst might not be entirely sated, but at least you will wet your throat.
The crowd were so many in numbers the police at several junctures feared a situation akin to a stampede. The event that began at 10 in the morning everyday for seven days from the 5th January to the 11th, saw crowds forming mile-long queues 9 a.m. onwards. Perhaps even before that. This spelled trouble, especially for exhibitors, who were pushed in with others in the same queue, especially at gate numbers 2 and 7. It was only few days before the wrapping up of the event that I learnt that one could come and go through other gates as well, which weren’t crowded at all, for example, gate number 4. Yes, I did feel silly.
Looking at the number of people at DC’s stall, you’d think there’s a match going on between India and Pakistan, and Tendulkar is batting. People. People. People. I was starting to lose my sanity. High-pitched screaming and stern rebuking – nothing worked on the crowd. I was crying hoarse over the mike telling them to keep moving, but nope. No reaction. They continued to stand and stare at the cars like a lone desert traveller in front of a fountain of sweet drinking water.
Those who visited the 2010 auto expo were extremely fortunate, because DC displayed some of his most awesome cars. The Imperator, a modified Innova and a modified Tata Winger.
Out of the three, The Imperator almost had people’s eye-balls sticking to it. The name Imperator has a Latin origin. It was a title originally, roughly equivalent to commander during the period of the Roman Republic. Dilip Chhabria designed The Imperator, a Super Sports Utility Vehicle for the launch of DYPDC College, one of Asia’s largest design schools. You can see the crowd’s pupils dilating, mouths parting in awe, eyebrows shooting up in wonder, and their whole self slowly slipping into a trance. And one can see why. The Imperator is not your conventional boxy, rugged SUV, but a rather sexy, sensual avatar. The Ying Yang (Tata Winger) and Innova too were very popular with the crowd.
I was asked a lot of questions and I gave answers to all of them, but some were just too funny to be answered with a straight face. One gentleman asked me, ‘Is this the modified Nano?’ Now, after looking at the size of the imperator, how can anyone even come up with such a question is beyond me? People know it’s a sports utility vehicle, and on top of it, an off road vehicle. Still someone had to ask me, ‘Sir, what’s the mileage of the car?’ Why would anyone care for the mileage if he is buying a SSUV? Someone came up with: ‘Sir, which is the base vehicle?’ On repeatedly telling the gentleman, ‘This is a concept vehicle, sir,’ he stuck to his question with the perseverance of a child: “That’s fine, sir, but which is the base model?” Finally I told him, ‘When I say it is a concept vehicle, sir, it means it’s been built bottoms up.’ Phew!
What was most heartening to see though was the amount of interest and enthusiasm for DYPDC College’s Automobile Design program, and when they learnt that Dilip Chhabria will be their Chief Mentor, you could almost feel their pulse racing. You could see them gushing looking at Dilip Chhabria interacting with the hordes of media channels.
Delhi-ites couldn’t get enough of the sleek, futuristic vehicles. At every stall, especially DC’s, people could be seen clamouring for space, elbowing each other to reach the front line, to get a better look at the vehicles, to click as many pictures as they could, using their high-definition cameras and others using their regular cell-phones. Many a car lovers lost their phones, wallets, glasses and what not, but the crowd continued crowding the stalls and showed no signs of abating.
Some yelled and screamed just to snatch the colourful and expensive brochures and pamphlets, (Maybe just for the heck of it. Maybe just because they were free) that were being distributed at every stall. You can see visitors at the end of the day, carrying heaps of brochures, like trophies. God only knows what they intend to do with them.
Everyone wanted to get in and a get a piece of the gorgeous vehicles lined up by the biggies in the auto world. The event witnessed around 50 global automobile launches. 50! Which is certainly a first for India. Leaving the other international expos aside, vehicle manufacturers chose India as their launch and/or showcase platform.
According to Wikipedia, India was ranked as the ninth largest in the world in the automotive sphere in the year 2008. In 2009, the global automotive industry reached a market size of 1.8 trillion, while India became Asia’s fourth largest exporter of automobiles, closely trailing Japan, South Korea and Thailand. Following the economic liberalization (de-licensing) in 1991, Indian automotive industry has demonstrated phenomenal growth, in fact growing at a staggering 17 percent on an average in the last few years. It is also heartening to know that the Indian automotive industry provides direct employment to about 5 lakh people and contributes 4.7 percent to India’s GDP. Presently, almost every major automobile player has a plant in India.
India is the hot, new force in the automobile world. We continue to do well even as the entire world reels under recession. From GM to BMW. From Audi to Mercedes. From Volkswagen to Renault. Everyone wants a share of the ever expanding Indian market, and are trying very, very hard to make a little space in Indian hearts. Some of the showcases at the expo included, GM’s Chevrolet Beat and Volt to Renault’s Fluence to Honda’s Jazz. Tata’s Prima to Jaguar’s SJ, Toyota’s Prius and Etios to Mercedez Benz’s Fascination to Harley Davidsons’ new, monster bikes. There was a whole section dedicated to vintage cars, and what cars! Absolutely splendid.
However, some credit for drawing eyeballs also goes to the good mix of Indian and foreign girls promoting vehicles of their respective employers. What was impressive to note was that they wore the outfits despite the icy bite in the Delhi air.
With a space of over 150 acres, Pragati Maidan was the perfect venue to host the expo. There were enough arrangements made for food-lovers with various stalls dishing out varied cuisine like choley bhaturey to chowmein to pizzas to rajma-chawal to International coffee (as expensive as 90 bucks for a cappuccino to as cheap as 20 bucks for Nescafe in a flimsy, plastic cup). But there were certain areas where they missed out. For example, the crowd management at the entrance, the lack of information booths, lack of directions to halls – this certainly made it difficult to go around without getting lost. And at times even lack of basic amenities, like water in washrooms. It meant having several men walking around the ground with unclean hands. The persevering ones did find water for a wash, including me.
All in all, a terrific trip and I eagerly look forward to go to the next auto expo.

Automobile Designers are highly imaginative souls who take forward their vision from a rough, concept sketch right through to the showroom floor. They not only define the aesthetics of an automobile, but also the functional aspects such as dashboard, seating, cabin interiors, boot space – every minute detail has to be taken care of.

However, their profile is much more complex as they need to develop a deep understanding of psychological and emotional issues connected to the concept of transportation and vehicles. They need to understand how users learn, recall, think; about their attitudes, as well as perceptions. They also need to design vehicles based on age groups, culture, and social groups.

While designing the right look for an automobile, they also need to consider several other factors such as cost of production, manufacturing limitations, ease of use, comfort, safety and environmental issues. Therefore, an automobile designer works on different levels.

Designers also need to be aware of everything around them, each an every development that takes place in the society. Life-changing trends such as globalization, technological advancements, global warming, economic and political changes, impact the society and influence the future.

And it doesn’t just stop there. Their next big task is to convince everyone around them: stakeholders, engineers, colleagues, co-designers – why they think their design is worth investing millions of dollars.

Automobile designers are artists and have similar temperament as artists. They are moody, like beautiful things and hang out with the ‘hip’ crowd.

We list here some of the famous, really cool Automobile Designers.

Harley Earl – This great man was the very founder of the automobile design profession in America. He was also the inventor of the Concept Car idea, and the creator of America’s, Small Car Trend. His protégés include greats like William Mitchell (General Motors), Richard Teague (American Motors), Eugene Bordinat (Ford Motor Company), and Elwood Engel (Chrysler Corp). He changed the face of General Motors.

Ian Cullum – After spending 11 years with Ford, he joined a small organization, TWR Design. “Some of my colleagues came to see me from Ford, and I’d walked away from this giant studio at Dunton, the corporation, all that stuff, into this little tin shed in Kidlington. They thought I was utterly mad. But I was as happy as could be, I was doing something I wanted to do.” He has designed some of the most popular cars such as Aston Martin DB7, Aston Martin Vanquish and Nissan R390. Presently, he heads the design division at Jaquar.

Frank Stephenson – Frank Stephenson, who is best known for BMW Mini, graduated from the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena. He has worked with the biggest automobile makers, including BMW, Ferrari, and presently Fiat.

Luc Donckerwolke – Luc Donckerwolke is the Belgian car designer whose stunning works includes the Lamborghini Murcielago and Gallardo. Presently he heads the design division at SEAT. He has also worked on Skoda Octavia, Fabia, few Audi models, and currently, SEAT Tribu and Ibiza.

Walter Maria de’Silva – Walter Maria de’Silva, the Italian car designer, currently heads Volkswagen’s Design team. Previously, he has worked with automobile giants such as Fiat and Alfa Romeo. He is the vision behind many great cars such as Alfa Romeo 145/146, SEAT Salsa and Tango, Audi Nuvolari Quattro, Volkswagen Polo, and Lamborghini Miura concept.

Martin Smith – Martin Smith, like every other boy was a car fanatic from a very early age. He wrote letters to Mini designer Alec Issigonis asking how to become a car designer. He is a graduate of the Royal College of Art, London. He is mostly known for his excellent work on Audi Quattro. He has worked with big names like Ford and General Motors. HE started his career in 1973 as a designer for Porsche AG.

Chris Bangle – Bangle is easily one of the most influential designers of the 21st century. He is best known for his work as Chief of Design at BMW group. He has previously worked with Opel and Fiat. He designed the Z9 Gran Turismo concept car, a futuristic vehicle that still has heads turning.

An article in Motor Trend’s article says:

“Love or loathe his work, Bangle’s impact on auto design has been profound. No other designer, not even legendary GM design chief Harley Earl, has so rapidly become a part of the industry lexicon.”[1]

Every designer is different. None of their work can be compared to each other. And just like in art, car design too, is subjective. Some like a particular design and some don’t. But every designer, just like artists, has work that does tremendously well, but also has work that is highly criticized.